Wednesday, July 30, 2014
karadin:

 
My library card already gets me multiple “real” books, e-books, audiobooks, magazines and movies per month. For free.
Kindle Unlimited offers nothing from big presses, and no guarantee the authors will get paid fairly for their work. Libraries buy the book up front for a higher price (and a better binding). Kindle Unlimited offers the authors a variable percentage of a as-yet-undetermined-and-unannounced amount of money. 
While Amazon touts Kindle Unlimited at “Netflix For Books!” the reality is Netflix signed contracts with everyone whose work they offer so that actors, screen writers, best boys, and the rest of those people get paid for the shows and movies you watch. Amazon does not.
That means your favorite author isn’t being compensated for their time or work. If you love a book series and want to see the next one get published: buy the book or hit the library. Starving authors quit writing because they like eating. 
I couldn’t hit the reblog button fast enough.

karadin:

 

My library card already gets me multiple “real” books, e-books, audiobooks, magazines and movies per month. For free.

Kindle Unlimited offers nothing from big presses, and no guarantee the authors will get paid fairly for their work. Libraries buy the book up front for a higher price (and a better binding). Kindle Unlimited offers the authors a variable percentage of a as-yet-undetermined-and-unannounced amount of money. 

While Amazon touts Kindle Unlimited at “Netflix For Books!” the reality is Netflix signed contracts with everyone whose work they offer so that actors, screen writers, best boys, and the rest of those people get paid for the shows and movies you watch. Amazon does not.

That means your favorite author isn’t being compensated for their time or work. If you love a book series and want to see the next one get published: buy the book or hit the library. Starving authors quit writing because they like eating. 

I couldn’t hit the reblog button fast enough.

(Source: lalie)

Saturday, July 12, 2014

theoceanspectre:

classicpenguin:

July 28th marks one hundred years since the beginning of the Great War. World War I was one of the most violent and destructive events in history. It’s vital that we remember and mourn these losses, but also essential that we celebrate the incredible outpouring of stunning art that emerged from this tragedy. In remembrance of all the soldiers, their world, and the art they made, here are a few reading suggestions for the WWI Centennial.

Sagittarius Rising by Cecil Lewis
When Cecil Lewis joined the RAF to fight in WWI, he was older than the field of aviation itself. Yet by the end of the war, Lewis had mastered virtually every single engine plane available, served three tours of duty, and lived through a dogfight with the Red Baron. Lewis’s memoir depicts the joys of flying—the exhilarating feeling of soaring the skies only to fly into combat moments later. Told by a charming, young narrator, Sagittarius Rising draws a bittersweet line between the beauty and terror of flight.

Testament of Youth by Vera Brittain
In Vera Brittain’s enduring memoir, the Great War encroaches upon the young author as she is at Oxford; the war claims her brother and her lover, and she, in turn, jumps into the fray by nursing the wounded. Unlike her lover and brother, Vera survives the war; she finds love again, but the battlefield still haunts her as she visits the graves of her loved ones and tours Germany and Italy—occupied and defeated. Testament of Youth provides us with a compelling account of how the monstrous tragedy that was the First World War crept into Vera and her contemporaries’ lives and affected them beyond the trenches.

The George Sherston Trilogy by Siegfried Sassoon
The fictional autobiography of a young man, Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man, Memoirs of an Infantry Officer, and Sherston’s Progress make up Siegfried Sassoon’s George Sherston Trilogy. Sherston, a young aristocrat, grows up prepared for a life of upper-class indulgence before the war intervenes. Based in part on Sassoon’s life, the Sherston trilogy portrays the world as it transitions from peaceful Edwardian naiveté to pure horror and its aftermath.

Storm of Steel by Ernst Jünger
One of the first memoirs published about the Great War, Storm of Steel provides a graphic account of trench warfare from the perspective of a German soldier on the infamous Western Front. Jünger lucidly describes war, neither glorifying it nor protesting it, but offering an intensely emotional, realist account of what happened. Brutally honest yet lyrical and luminous, Storm of Steel is a beautiful memoir of terror.

Under Fire by Henri Barbusse
War was not constantly explosive. Much time was spent sitting and waiting—fearing what was come. Featuring a group of men in the French Sixth Battalion, Under Fire gives an account of the terrible boredom, as the soldiers wait for what seems like an eternity to pass while the war hangs over their heads. A classic antiwar novel, Barbusse uses time in trenches to bring life to memorable characters, refusing to romanticize in his attempts to offer an authentic vision of war.

The Enormous Room by e.e. cummings
One of the most important poets of 20th century America, e.e. cummings also volunteered as an ambulance driver in France during WWI. Though best-known for his poetry, The Enormous Room displays cummings’s stunning command of prose. In this autobiographical novel, the poet’s service takes a more farcical turn when he is arrested for treason. With unexpected warmth and joy, cummings describes a quest for freedom indebted to Pilgrim’s Progress, all the while offering a series of brilliant and eclectic portraits of his fellow inmates.

Paths of Glory by Humphrey Cobb
Already suffering in the trenches, a group of French soldiers is sent on an impossible mission to attack an all-but-invincible German base. When the mission fails, the soldiers are considered cowards and are prosecuted for treason in a military tribunal. Famously adapted by Stanley Kubrick, Paths of Glory illustrates the difficulty, if not the absurdity, of the impossible demands that were put on ordinary men and how as factories began to produce weapons, the courts began to deliver injustice.

Death of a Hero by Richard Aldington
George Winterbourne is raised a typical patriotic Englishman. A failed businessman turned-artist and socialist, he enlists to avoid a worsening domestic crisis. And as his superiors quickly die out, George receives a spate of promotions. Yet he grows increasingly cynical about not only the war but also the England he serves. Death of a Hero is a biting critique of a British society that remains all but ignorant of the trials and tribulations of its soldiers on the battlefield.

Return of the Soldier by Rebecca West
Soldiers, wounded or discharged, eventually came home, and it was up to their families to take care of the shell-shocked men. Return of the Soldier provides a touching but crushing account of a traumatized soldier who believes he is in love with a working-class woman instead of his aristocratic wife. Concise and haunting, this novella examines what it means to heal a soldier—and what even constitutes healing, when health meant a return to the front.

Three Soldiers by John Dos Passos
Three Soldiers is a novel of war, but not one of combat. Dos Passos introduces three starkly different Americans fighting in France, each gradually and vividly brought to life through their interior lives. A modernist antiwar masterpiece, this novel grimly portrays the petty cruelties that kept the machine of war running, stripping soldiers of their ambition and humanity.

Penguin Book of First World War Poetry
Perhaps no artistic output from the Great War can equal the astounding quantity and quality of its poetry. From the trenches to the skies and the battlefield to home front, the setting and feeling of this poetry cover diverse territory. In this anthology, verses by poets such as Rupert Brooke, Siegfried Sassoon, and Wilfred Owen are arranged thematically from topics such as propagandist patriotism to a deep yearning for peace.

Three Poets of the First World War: Ivor Gurney, Isaac Rosenberg, Wilfred Owen
Bringing together Ivor Gurney, Wilfred Owen, and Isaac Rosenberg, this collection provides a selection by three of War’s greatest poets. Gurney was a classical composer whose poetry retains a lyrical, musical touch. Owen, perhaps the quintessential soldier-poet, portrays the war’s horrors with great and brutal honesty. And Rosenberg, also a painter, composed some of the finest poetry to come out of the war in his Poems from the Trenches (make sure to read “Break of Day in the Trenches” and “Louse Hunting”).

Penguin Book of First World War Stories
Featuring a diverse selection of authors writing before, after, and long after the war, ranging from Joseph Conrad and Rudyard Kipling to Katherine Mansfield and Julian Barnes, this collection of short stories illustrates the impact of the Great War on not only the soldiers, but also on British society, politics, and culture—all irrevocably altered by one of the most violent events in human history.

[This post is more than a little perfectly timed, giving me, as it does, several new ideas for my First World War–related reading this year. My interest is particularly piqued here by the Rebecca West novel (such an arresting, beautiful cover, too).]

Tuesday, July 1, 2014
lesbianregreat:

Book review: Awfully Devoted Women by Cameron Duder

The lives of lesbians in English Canada prior to 1965 are as secretive and cloaked as the relationships during that time. While much has been documented about lesbian relationships experienced by women in upper-class and working-class circles, the types of same-sex relationships experienced by middle-class women in Canada have been largely unaccounted for. Vancouver author Cameron Duder attempts to uncover and build intimate portraits of these women in Awfully Devoted Women: Lesbian Lives in Canada, 1900-65.

lesbianregreat:

Book review: Awfully Devoted Women by Cameron Duder

The lives of lesbians in English Canada prior to 1965 are as secretive and cloaked as the relationships during that time. While much has been documented about lesbian relationships experienced by women in upper-class and working-class circles, the types of same-sex relationships experienced by middle-class women in Canada have been largely unaccounted for. Vancouver author Cameron Duder attempts to uncover and build intimate portraits of these women in Awfully Devoted Women: Lesbian Lives in Canada, 1900-65.

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

zomganthro:

sassygayartisan:

does anyone have any books that talk about the history of africa or the americas that explains it in a manner that DOESN’T focus on european history and does so in a way that talks more about the rise and fall of civilizations as opposed to “there were tribes here la dee dah!” 

because i need to learn way more about the pre-imperialist africa and the americas and i want to understand it in a lens that doesn’t make them out to be savage and animalistic thank u 

I bet you guys have TONS of suggestions!

Someone mentioned 1491. It is pretty good, though the author gets a lot of info from post-contact sources. He does make sure to point that out himself though, and it is still a pretty interesting read.

(Source: jdragsky)

Tuesday, June 11, 2013
  • When not all the books in the series are the same height.
  • When books change covers with editions so they don’t all match unless you buy the series in one go.
  • When some books are hardcover and some are softcover and it doesn’t match but you can’t find another copy.
  • When some covers are different in certain countries so you don’t get the main one which also happens to look better than all the other varieties.
  • Basically just books.
  • God damn them.

(Source: thefictionthief)

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

diversityinya:

9 young adult books about South Asian main characters:

(book descriptions are from WorldCat; links go to Barnes & Noble)

Sita’s Ramayana by Samhita Arni and Moyna Chitrakar (Groundwood Books, 2011)

This version of the The Ramayana is told from the perspective of Sita, the queen. It is an allegorical story that contains important Hindu teachings, and it has had great influence on Indian life and culture over the centuries.

Devil’s Kiss by Sarwat Chadda (Disney Hyperion, 2009)

Fifteen-year-old Billi SanGreal has grown up knowing that being a member of the Knights Templar puts her in danger, but if she is to save London from catastrophe she must make sacrifices greater than she imagined.

Skunk Girl by Sheba Karim (Farrar Straus Giroux, 2009)

Nina Khan is not just the only Asian or Muslim student in her small-town high school in upstate New York, she is also faces the legacy of her “Supernerd” older sister, body hair, and the pain of having a crush when her parents forbid her to date.

What I Meant by Marie Lamba (Random House Children’s Books, 2007)

Having to share her home with her demanding and devious aunt from India makes it all the more difficult for fifteen-year-old Sang to deal with such things as her parents thinking she is too young to date, getting less than perfect grades, and being shut out by her long-time best friend.

Shine, Coconut Moon by Neesha Meminger (Margaret K. McElderry Books, 2009)

In the days and weeks following the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, Samar, who is of Punjabi heritage but has been raised with no knowledge of her past by her single mother, wants to learn about her family’s history and to get in touch with the grandparents her mother shuns.

Karma by Cathy Ostlere (Razorbill, 2011)

In 1984, following her mother’s suicide, 15-year-old Maya and her Sikh father travel to New Delhi from Canada to place her mother’s ashes in their final resting place. On the night of their arrival, Prime Minister Indira Gandhi is assassinated, Maya and her father are separated when the city erupts in chaos, and Maya must rely on Sandeep, a boy she has just met, for survival.

Guantanamo Boy by Anna Perera (Albert Whitman, 2011)

Six months after the events of September 11, 2001, Khalid, a Muslim fifteen-year-old boy from England is kidnapped during a family trip to Pakistan and imprisoned in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where he is held for two years suffering interrogations, water-boarding, isolation, and more for reasons unknown to him.

First Daughter: White House Rules by Mitali Perkins (Dutton Children’s Books, 2008)

Once sixteen-year-old Sameera Righton’s father is elected president of the United States, the adopted Pakistani-American girl moves into the White House and makes some decisions about how she is going to live her life in the spotlight.

Koyal Dark, Mango Sweet by Kashmira Sheth (Hyperion, 2006)

Growing up with her family in Mumbai, India, sixteen-year-old Jeeta disagrees with much of her mother’s traditional advice about how to live her life and tries to be more modern and independent.

The House of Djinn by Suzanne Fisher Staples (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2008)

An unexpected death brings Shabanu’s daughter, Mumtaz, and nephew, Jameel, both aged fifteen, to the forefront of an attempt to modernize Pakistan, but the teens must both sacrifice their own dreams if they are to meet family and tribal expectations.

Thursday, April 11, 2013

peanutbutta:

It either takes me 5 months to read a book or I read five of them in 2 days. There is no inbetween.

Saturday, March 2, 2013
lesbianlegbreaker:

dyslexic-kids:

10 Sites To Download Free Audio Books
If you’re looking for a place to download some free audio books, you’re in luck. Whether you want to get inspired, scared by a mystery, or simply have something to listen to on a long drive, there are loads of places to find free audio books. They may not be on the New York Times Bestseller list but that doesn’t mean they’re not worth your time.
For example, Sun Tzu’s ‘Art of War’ is not quite selling like the ‘Shades of Gray’ but it’s an important read. In any case, these sites all host free audio books that are worth checking out!
NOTE: These are all legal sites that host public domain books. There’s more than enough great stuff in these libraries so check them each out when you have the time!
Free Classic Audio Books
This site hosts a myriad of books that are all in mp3 or m4b format. You can find what you’re looking for by sorting by the author’s last name. The advantage of using the iPod format (m4b) is that it remembers where you stop in a file.
Project Gutenberg
Another source for the classics. Read timeless tales from Dickens, Poe, and more with Project Gutenberg’s massive inventory. Boasting more than 2,000 free audiobooks in basically all categories, this should be one of your bookmarked sites!
Books Should Be Free
Like the aforementioned ‘Art of War,’ many all-time bestsellers are available on Books Should Be Free. They’re from the public domain and you can find what you’re looking for through some handy sorting tools. Want a children’s book? How about just seeing the adult book results? Yep, you can do that.
Librophile
When you first go to this site, you’re shown the price of every book. That price is $0.00, possibly the best price ever. Librophile has a substantial library of audio books as well as e-books that you can search by keyword, language, price (free), and more.
Lit2Go
Lit2Go is a free online collection of stories and poems in Mp3 (audiobook) format. An abstract, citation, playing time, and word count are given for each of the passages. Many of the passages also have a related reading strategy identified. Each reading passage can also be downloaded as a PDF and printed for use as a read-along or as supplemental reading material for your classroom.
LibriVox
LibriVox provides free audiobooks from the public domain. There are several options for listening. LibriVox volunteers record chapters of books in the public domain and release the audio files back onto the net. Our goal is to make all public domain books available as free audio books.
LearnOutLoud Free Audio
LearnOutLoud.com has scoured the Internet to bring you over 5000 free audio and video titles. This directory features free audio books, lectures, speeches, sermons, interviews, and many other great free audio and video resources. Most audio titles can be downloaded in digital formats such as MP3 and most video titles are available to stream online. Enjoy!
Podiobooks
The term podiobook was coined by Evo Terra in April 2005 to describe serialized audiobooks which are distributed via RSS, much like a podcast. Podiobooks is supported by donations (if you use it, you should think about giving!) and boasts a solid set of sorting tools. You can browse popular books, award-winning books, all titles, etc. Lots of great novels in here!
Storynory
Beautifully read audio stories for children and adults. Listen online or via podcast or app. Fairytales, myths, legends and stories from around the world.
AudioCloset
The audiobooks are absolutely free. They have a solid set of books that are worth reading such as Kipling and Dickens. All audiobooks have been recorded especially for the AudioCloset website.

Audiobooks kept me going while working the night shift. I definitely recommend it.
Additionally, not everyone has the easiest time with reading (this post originally comes from Dyslexic Kids), so signal boosts would be awesome.

lesbianlegbreaker:

dyslexic-kids:

10 Sites To Download Free Audio Books

If you’re looking for a place to download some free audio books, you’re in luck. Whether you want to get inspired, scared by a mystery, or simply have something to listen to on a long drive, there are loads of places to find free audio books. They may not be on the New York Times Bestseller list but that doesn’t mean they’re not worth your time.

For example, Sun Tzu’s ‘Art of War’ is not quite selling like the ‘Shades of Gray’ but it’s an important read. In any case, these sites all host free audio books that are worth checking out!

NOTE: These are all legal sites that host public domain books. There’s more than enough great stuff in these libraries so check them each out when you have the time!

Free Classic Audio Books

This site hosts a myriad of books that are all in mp3 or m4b format. You can find what you’re looking for by sorting by the author’s last name. The advantage of using the iPod format (m4b) is that it remembers where you stop in a file.

Project Gutenberg

Another source for the classics. Read timeless tales from Dickens, Poe, and more with Project Gutenberg’s massive inventory. Boasting more than 2,000 free audiobooks in basically all categories, this should be one of your bookmarked sites!

Books Should Be Free

Like the aforementioned ‘Art of War,’ many all-time bestsellers are available on Books Should Be Free. They’re from the public domain and you can find what you’re looking for through some handy sorting tools. Want a children’s book? How about just seeing the adult book results? Yep, you can do that.

Librophile

When you first go to this site, you’re shown the price of every book. That price is $0.00, possibly the best price ever. Librophile has a substantial library of audio books as well as e-books that you can search by keyword, language, price (free), and more.

Lit2Go

Lit2Go is a free online collection of stories and poems in Mp3 (audiobook) format. An abstract, citation, playing time, and word count are given for each of the passages. Many of the passages also have a related reading strategy identified. Each reading passage can also be downloaded as a PDF and printed for use as a read-along or as supplemental reading material for your classroom.

LibriVox

LibriVox provides free audiobooks from the public domain. There are several options for listening. LibriVox volunteers record chapters of books in the public domain and release the audio files back onto the net. Our goal is to make all public domain books available as free audio books.

LearnOutLoud Free Audio

LearnOutLoud.com has scoured the Internet to bring you over 5000 free audio and video titles. This directory features free audio books, lectures, speeches, sermons, interviews, and many other great free audio and video resources. Most audio titles can be downloaded in digital formats such as MP3 and most video titles are available to stream online. Enjoy!

Podiobooks

The term podiobook was coined by Evo Terra in April 2005 to describe serialized audiobooks which are distributed via RSS, much like a podcast. Podiobooks is supported by donations (if you use it, you should think about giving!) and boasts a solid set of sorting tools. You can browse popular books, award-winning books, all titles, etc. Lots of great novels in here!

Storynory

Beautifully read audio stories for children and adults. Listen online or via podcast or app. Fairytales, myths, legends and stories from around the world.

AudioCloset

The audiobooks are absolutely free. They have a solid set of books that are worth reading such as Kipling and Dickens. All audiobooks have been recorded especially for the AudioCloset website.

Audiobooks kept me going while working the night shift. I definitely recommend it.

Additionally, not everyone has the easiest time with reading (this post originally comes from Dyslexic Kids), so signal boosts would be awesome.

Saturday, February 16, 2013

tooraloora:

anndruyan:

This is a summary of college only using two pictures; expensive as hell.

That’s my Sociology “book”. In fact what it is is a piece of paper with codes written on it to allow me to access an electronic version of a book. I was told by my professor that I could not buy any other paperback version, or use another code, so I was left with no option other than buying a piece of paper for over $200. Best part about all this is my professor wrote the books; there’s something hilariously sadistic about that. So I pretty much doled out $200 for a current edition of an online textbook that is no different than an older, paperback edition of the same book for $5; yeah, I checked. My mistake for listening to my professor.

This is why we download. 

Never, EVER buy the newest edition of a book.

I PROMISE you there are cheaper alternatives, even if your professor says the old version is totally useless. 9 times out of 10, that’s completely false. 

Tuesday, January 22, 2013