Tuesday, October 21, 2014
firstsecondbooks:

weneeddiversebooks:

corinneduyvis:

weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks YA Flow Chart!
Like thrillers? Contemporary? Romance? Graphic Novels? Humor? We’ve got recommendations for you!

For anyone who may be unable to read the graphic or just wants easy links of the books, here’s a transcription.
Looking for a diverse YA book? Just follow the arrows to what you love for a perfect read!
Sports?Hoops by Walter Dean MyersBall Don’t Lie by Matt de la Peña
Romance?To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny HanTwo Boys Kissing by David LevithanIf You Could Be Mine by Sara Farizan
Action or Psychological Thriller?Fake ID by Lamar GilesPanic by Sharon M. DraperPointe by Brandy ColbertGirl Stolen by April Henry
Funny?Openly Straight by Bill KonigsbergSince You Asked by Maurene GooSoul Enchilada by David Macinnis Gill
Adventure & Vicarious Travels?Flygirl by Sherri L. SmithHuntress by Malinda LoSummer of the Mariposas by Guadalupe Garcia McCall
Fantasy?City of a Thousand Dolls by Miriam ForsterDevil’s Kiss by Sarwat ChaddaOtherbound by Corinne DuyvisAkata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor
Graphic Novels?The Shadow Hero by Gene Luen Yang & Sonny LiewPersepolis by Marjane SatrapiYummy: The Last Days of a Southside Shorty by G. Neri and Randy DuBurkeThe Undertaking of Lily Chen by Danica NovgorodoffTrickster: Native American Tales by Matt Dembicki
Dystopian & Science Fiction?Proxy by Alex LondonControl by Lydia KangThe Summer Prince by Alaya Dawn JohnsonKiller of Enemies by Joseph BruchacDiverse Energies edited by Tobias S. Buckell and Joe Monti
OtherTasting the Sky: A Palestinian Childhood by Ibtisam BarakatBrown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline WoodsonYaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass by Meg MedinaAristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saénz

Thank you Corinne!!

We’re so glad to be included in this list!

firstsecondbooks:

weneeddiversebooks:

corinneduyvis:

weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks YA Flow Chart!

Like thrillers? Contemporary? Romance? Graphic Novels? Humor? We’ve got recommendations for you!

For anyone who may be unable to read the graphic or just wants easy links of the books, here’s a transcription.

Looking for a diverse YA book? Just follow the arrows to what you love for a perfect read!

Sports?
Hoops by Walter Dean Myers
Ball Don’t Lie by Matt de la Peña

Romance?
To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han
Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan
If You Could Be Mine by Sara Farizan

Action or Psychological Thriller?
Fake ID by Lamar Giles
Panic by Sharon M. Draper
Pointe by Brandy Colbert
Girl Stolen by April Henry

Funny?
Openly Straight by Bill Konigsberg
Since You Asked by Maurene Goo
Soul Enchilada by David Macinnis Gill

Adventure & Vicarious Travels?
Flygirl by Sherri L. Smith
Huntress by Malinda Lo
Summer of the Mariposas by Guadalupe Garcia McCall

Fantasy?
City of a Thousand Dolls by Miriam Forster
Devil’s Kiss by Sarwat Chadda
Otherbound by Corinne Duyvis
Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor

Graphic Novels?
The Shadow Hero by Gene Luen Yang & Sonny Liew
Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi
Yummy: The Last Days of a Southside Shorty by G. Neri and Randy DuBurke
The Undertaking of Lily Chen by Danica Novgorodoff
Trickster: Native American Tales by Matt Dembicki

Dystopian & Science Fiction?
Proxy by Alex London
Control by Lydia Kang
The Summer Prince by Alaya Dawn Johnson
Killer of Enemies by Joseph Bruchac
Diverse Energies edited by Tobias S. Buckell and Joe Monti

Other
Tasting the Sky: A Palestinian Childhood by Ibtisam Barakat
Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson
Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass by Meg Medina
Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saénz

Thank you Corinne!!

We’re so glad to be included in this list!

Tuesday, October 14, 2014 Wednesday, October 8, 2014

yasimon:

This week is Mental Illness Awareness Week in Canada.

Mental illness affects 1 in 5 youth in Canada, and in tragic instances, may lead to suicidal thoughts or behaviours. Every year, there are over 700 young Canadians who die by suicide, making it the second leading cause of death among 15 to 25 year olds. 

Partners for Mental Health (PFMH) has put together a guide for parents on how to talk to teenagers about mental health. The Right by You campaign offers a free guide and toolkit that parents and caregivers can download at rightbyyou.ca.

Sometimes, books can help start difficult but essential conversations.

We’ve put together a reading list with some of our best and most compelling reads about teens struggling with mental illness. 

Counting Backwards

The Murmurings

Waiting

The Treatment

Glimpse

Lovely, Dark and Deep

Saturday, September 13, 2014 Monday, August 18, 2014

katzhangwriter:

ECHOES OF US release giveaway!

I’ve been interested in photography for a while now, and I was really excited these past few months to get to work with vlcphoto on some shoots. In particular, we did a series of Hybrid Chronicles themed shoots with two lovely models to play Eva/Addie and Ryan/Devon.

I’ll be releasing a new photograph (and accompanying quote from ECHOES OF US!) every Friday and Monday until we run out ;) Help me celebrate by re-blogging and I’ll enter you into the contest to win:

EITHER:

- 1 signed copy of WHAT’S LEFT OF ME (book 1)

- 1 signed copy of ONCE WE WERE (book 2)

- 1 signed ARC of ECHOES OF US (book 3) 

I wanted to give you guys options so new readers can win whichever book in the series they need. :D

I’ll choose a winner at the end of each week and message you.

Everyone go check out vlcphoto's other work! She was really awesome to take these pictures <3 (Thanks, Vania! And huge thanks to Meredith and Brandon for modeling for us)

If you’re looking for the other pics in the series, here’s the link to Pic #1

(please don’t delete this message when re-blogging)

Thursday, July 31, 2014

medievalpoc:

behind-the-book:

High School Reading List

Back in May, the #weneeddiversebooks campaign lit a fire to fulfill the desperate need for diverse books in children’s literature. Behind the Book has always championed efforts to find diverse authors and protagonists that will appeal to students since we serve communities of color. For your enjoyment (and enrichment), we’ve created an epic list of diverse books to reflect the diversity in our city; here’s our list for high school students.

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Drown by Junot Diaz

Kindred by Octavia E. Butler

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

The Chaos by Nalo Hopkinson

Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor

The Living by Matt De La Peña, a Behind the Book author

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

The Pearl that Broke Its Shell: a Novel by Nadia Hashimi

Mare’s War by Tanita S. Davis

A Teaspoon of Earth and Sea by Dina Nayeri

The Book of Unknown Americans: a Novel by Cristina Henríquez

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah

Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle

Naughts & Crosses by Malorie Blackman

The Icarus Girl by Helen Oyeyemi

For descriptions, click the read more!

(Click the following links to be directed to the Kindergarten, (early) Elementary and Middle School lists)

Read More

This goes right into the “books" and "resources" tags.

I’ve featured quite a few of these books for Fiction Week, and I know that many educators would be interested in a list like this. Thanks for making it.

Wednesday, July 30, 2014
karadin:

 
My library card already gets me multiple “real” books, e-books, audiobooks, magazines and movies per month. For free.
Kindle Unlimited offers nothing from big presses, and no guarantee the authors will get paid fairly for their work. Libraries buy the book up front for a higher price (and a better binding). Kindle Unlimited offers the authors a variable percentage of a as-yet-undetermined-and-unannounced amount of money. 
While Amazon touts Kindle Unlimited at “Netflix For Books!” the reality is Netflix signed contracts with everyone whose work they offer so that actors, screen writers, best boys, and the rest of those people get paid for the shows and movies you watch. Amazon does not.
That means your favorite author isn’t being compensated for their time or work. If you love a book series and want to see the next one get published: buy the book or hit the library. Starving authors quit writing because they like eating. 
I couldn’t hit the reblog button fast enough.

karadin:

 

My library card already gets me multiple “real” books, e-books, audiobooks, magazines and movies per month. For free.

Kindle Unlimited offers nothing from big presses, and no guarantee the authors will get paid fairly for their work. Libraries buy the book up front for a higher price (and a better binding). Kindle Unlimited offers the authors a variable percentage of a as-yet-undetermined-and-unannounced amount of money. 

While Amazon touts Kindle Unlimited at “Netflix For Books!” the reality is Netflix signed contracts with everyone whose work they offer so that actors, screen writers, best boys, and the rest of those people get paid for the shows and movies you watch. Amazon does not.

That means your favorite author isn’t being compensated for their time or work. If you love a book series and want to see the next one get published: buy the book or hit the library. Starving authors quit writing because they like eating. 

I couldn’t hit the reblog button fast enough.

(Source: lalie)

Saturday, July 12, 2014

theoceanspectre:

classicpenguin:

July 28th marks one hundred years since the beginning of the Great War. World War I was one of the most violent and destructive events in history. It’s vital that we remember and mourn these losses, but also essential that we celebrate the incredible outpouring of stunning art that emerged from this tragedy. In remembrance of all the soldiers, their world, and the art they made, here are a few reading suggestions for the WWI Centennial.

Sagittarius Rising by Cecil Lewis
When Cecil Lewis joined the RAF to fight in WWI, he was older than the field of aviation itself. Yet by the end of the war, Lewis had mastered virtually every single engine plane available, served three tours of duty, and lived through a dogfight with the Red Baron. Lewis’s memoir depicts the joys of flying—the exhilarating feeling of soaring the skies only to fly into combat moments later. Told by a charming, young narrator, Sagittarius Rising draws a bittersweet line between the beauty and terror of flight.

Testament of Youth by Vera Brittain
In Vera Brittain’s enduring memoir, the Great War encroaches upon the young author as she is at Oxford; the war claims her brother and her lover, and she, in turn, jumps into the fray by nursing the wounded. Unlike her lover and brother, Vera survives the war; she finds love again, but the battlefield still haunts her as she visits the graves of her loved ones and tours Germany and Italy—occupied and defeated. Testament of Youth provides us with a compelling account of how the monstrous tragedy that was the First World War crept into Vera and her contemporaries’ lives and affected them beyond the trenches.

The George Sherston Trilogy by Siegfried Sassoon
The fictional autobiography of a young man, Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man, Memoirs of an Infantry Officer, and Sherston’s Progress make up Siegfried Sassoon’s George Sherston Trilogy. Sherston, a young aristocrat, grows up prepared for a life of upper-class indulgence before the war intervenes. Based in part on Sassoon’s life, the Sherston trilogy portrays the world as it transitions from peaceful Edwardian naiveté to pure horror and its aftermath.

Storm of Steel by Ernst Jünger
One of the first memoirs published about the Great War, Storm of Steel provides a graphic account of trench warfare from the perspective of a German soldier on the infamous Western Front. Jünger lucidly describes war, neither glorifying it nor protesting it, but offering an intensely emotional, realist account of what happened. Brutally honest yet lyrical and luminous, Storm of Steel is a beautiful memoir of terror.

Under Fire by Henri Barbusse
War was not constantly explosive. Much time was spent sitting and waiting—fearing what was come. Featuring a group of men in the French Sixth Battalion, Under Fire gives an account of the terrible boredom, as the soldiers wait for what seems like an eternity to pass while the war hangs over their heads. A classic antiwar novel, Barbusse uses time in trenches to bring life to memorable characters, refusing to romanticize in his attempts to offer an authentic vision of war.

The Enormous Room by e.e. cummings
One of the most important poets of 20th century America, e.e. cummings also volunteered as an ambulance driver in France during WWI. Though best-known for his poetry, The Enormous Room displays cummings’s stunning command of prose. In this autobiographical novel, the poet’s service takes a more farcical turn when he is arrested for treason. With unexpected warmth and joy, cummings describes a quest for freedom indebted to Pilgrim’s Progress, all the while offering a series of brilliant and eclectic portraits of his fellow inmates.

Paths of Glory by Humphrey Cobb
Already suffering in the trenches, a group of French soldiers is sent on an impossible mission to attack an all-but-invincible German base. When the mission fails, the soldiers are considered cowards and are prosecuted for treason in a military tribunal. Famously adapted by Stanley Kubrick, Paths of Glory illustrates the difficulty, if not the absurdity, of the impossible demands that were put on ordinary men and how as factories began to produce weapons, the courts began to deliver injustice.

Death of a Hero by Richard Aldington
George Winterbourne is raised a typical patriotic Englishman. A failed businessman turned-artist and socialist, he enlists to avoid a worsening domestic crisis. And as his superiors quickly die out, George receives a spate of promotions. Yet he grows increasingly cynical about not only the war but also the England he serves. Death of a Hero is a biting critique of a British society that remains all but ignorant of the trials and tribulations of its soldiers on the battlefield.

Return of the Soldier by Rebecca West
Soldiers, wounded or discharged, eventually came home, and it was up to their families to take care of the shell-shocked men. Return of the Soldier provides a touching but crushing account of a traumatized soldier who believes he is in love with a working-class woman instead of his aristocratic wife. Concise and haunting, this novella examines what it means to heal a soldier—and what even constitutes healing, when health meant a return to the front.

Three Soldiers by John Dos Passos
Three Soldiers is a novel of war, but not one of combat. Dos Passos introduces three starkly different Americans fighting in France, each gradually and vividly brought to life through their interior lives. A modernist antiwar masterpiece, this novel grimly portrays the petty cruelties that kept the machine of war running, stripping soldiers of their ambition and humanity.

Penguin Book of First World War Poetry
Perhaps no artistic output from the Great War can equal the astounding quantity and quality of its poetry. From the trenches to the skies and the battlefield to home front, the setting and feeling of this poetry cover diverse territory. In this anthology, verses by poets such as Rupert Brooke, Siegfried Sassoon, and Wilfred Owen are arranged thematically from topics such as propagandist patriotism to a deep yearning for peace.

Three Poets of the First World War: Ivor Gurney, Isaac Rosenberg, Wilfred Owen
Bringing together Ivor Gurney, Wilfred Owen, and Isaac Rosenberg, this collection provides a selection by three of War’s greatest poets. Gurney was a classical composer whose poetry retains a lyrical, musical touch. Owen, perhaps the quintessential soldier-poet, portrays the war’s horrors with great and brutal honesty. And Rosenberg, also a painter, composed some of the finest poetry to come out of the war in his Poems from the Trenches (make sure to read “Break of Day in the Trenches” and “Louse Hunting”).

Penguin Book of First World War Stories
Featuring a diverse selection of authors writing before, after, and long after the war, ranging from Joseph Conrad and Rudyard Kipling to Katherine Mansfield and Julian Barnes, this collection of short stories illustrates the impact of the Great War on not only the soldiers, but also on British society, politics, and culture—all irrevocably altered by one of the most violent events in human history.

[This post is more than a little perfectly timed, giving me, as it does, several new ideas for my First World War–related reading this year. My interest is particularly piqued here by the Rebecca West novel (such an arresting, beautiful cover, too).]

Tuesday, July 1, 2014
lesbianregreat:

Book review: Awfully Devoted Women by Cameron Duder

The lives of lesbians in English Canada prior to 1965 are as secretive and cloaked as the relationships during that time. While much has been documented about lesbian relationships experienced by women in upper-class and working-class circles, the types of same-sex relationships experienced by middle-class women in Canada have been largely unaccounted for. Vancouver author Cameron Duder attempts to uncover and build intimate portraits of these women in Awfully Devoted Women: Lesbian Lives in Canada, 1900-65.

lesbianregreat:

Book review: Awfully Devoted Women by Cameron Duder

The lives of lesbians in English Canada prior to 1965 are as secretive and cloaked as the relationships during that time. While much has been documented about lesbian relationships experienced by women in upper-class and working-class circles, the types of same-sex relationships experienced by middle-class women in Canada have been largely unaccounted for. Vancouver author Cameron Duder attempts to uncover and build intimate portraits of these women in Awfully Devoted Women: Lesbian Lives in Canada, 1900-65.

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

zomganthro:

sassygayartisan:

does anyone have any books that talk about the history of africa or the americas that explains it in a manner that DOESN’T focus on european history and does so in a way that talks more about the rise and fall of civilizations as opposed to “there were tribes here la dee dah!” 

because i need to learn way more about the pre-imperialist africa and the americas and i want to understand it in a lens that doesn’t make them out to be savage and animalistic thank u 

I bet you guys have TONS of suggestions!

Someone mentioned 1491. It is pretty good, though the author gets a lot of info from post-contact sources. He does make sure to point that out himself though, and it is still a pretty interesting read.

(Source: jdragsky)